Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today

“It suggests we may have some breathing room, and that may help every country get back on its feet, in terms of the economy and keeping its population safe,” Apoorva said. “It also means that we may actually be able to contain this pandemic a little sooner than we had worried.”


With more than 150,000 virus cases daily, the nation is shutting down again.

California, Washington State and Oregon have closed indoor dining, among other measures. The mayor of Chicago instituted a new stay-at-home order, and Philadelphia’s mayor slapped a ban on most indoor gatherings as part of new sweeping regulations.

Cue the resistance.

The backlash to virus restrictions that the country experienced in the spring is once again cropping up. Resistance has been especially fierce in Michigan, where Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, halted the operation of casinos, movie theaters and in-person learning at high schools and colleges for three weeks beginning Wednesday. A Republican state legislator quickly called for her to be impeached, and Dr. Scott Atlas, President Trump’s coronavirus adviser, urged people in the state to “rise up” in protest.

In Oregon, after Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, limited social gatherings to six people and threatened fines or arrests to those who don’t comply, the Republican chairwoman of a board of county commissioners posted a message on Facebook that read: “My family will celebrate Thanksgiving dinner with as many family and friends as I can find. Gov Brown is WRONG to order otherwise.”

But it’s not just Democrats who are experiencing blowback. Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio, a Republican, ordered a curfew today on businesses from 10 p.m. until 5 a.m. But even before he made any announcement, Mr. Trump issued a warning on Twitter, suggesting that he might support a primary challenger against the Republican governor.

For other Republican governors, the price of inaction while their hospitals are pushed to the limit is too high. After resisting mask mandates, the governors of Utah, North Dakota, Iowa and West Virginia have reversed course in recent days and called on residents to cover their faces.

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